Blue Flower

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn
Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

IMG 20170627 185508
After watching a few cooking shows (mostly America's Test Kitchen) we were craving mushrooms. Yes, mushrooms. I've certainly cooked with them over the years but after seeing some of the concoctions they created I declared this week to be "Mushroom Week". And believe it or not there's even an existing hashtag #mushroomweek that you can find on Instagram. I've posted photos there so you can follow along and drool. Or better yet, have at some fungal gastronomy on your own. When you do be sure to post to IG with the hashtag #mushroomweek and let me know about it. 


Here's our first meal based loosely on a recipe for shrimp and mushrooms. I don't plan on posting the entire recipe here but I'll give the highlights and a few pictures.

(Here's the original recipe from Cook's Country.)

IMG_20170627_184846_517.jpg

The basics

Mushrooms - shiitake and white mushrooms - about a pound

Shrimp - get the largest you can find

Artichoke hearts - 1/2 pound

I cooked them each sequentially in olive oil and garlic in the same pan then added 1/2 cup white wine and some red pepper flakes. 

IMG_20170627_185200.jpg

I let it cook down and at the end added 3 tablespoons of butter. You know that no sauce is complete without butter, right? It's true!

Once all was cooked down it was time to eat. And the combo didn't disappoint. I may add more red pepper next time but this is a winner, and a great start to our #mushroomweek experiment.

IMG_20170627_185508.jpg

Try it yourself.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

yellowHere's a short podcast I made regarding a test that I'm doing to display images that have some motion in them. It's an interesting concept. You can see the image at http://photoswithmovement.com/. Listen to my introduction below. 

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Makers Mark 53 of 133

Maker’s Mark is a long standing favorite in the bourbon world. Its distinctive red wax seal has been copied in several different ways by multiple types of spirits. Our visit to the Maker’s Mark distillery was a lesson in history and craft. And we also had the opportunity to experience two of the brand’s newer offerings.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Michters 23 of 135Bourbon is all about the taste. But it’s also about the story behind what makes the taste. And that’s specially true with Michter’s Distillery’s bourbons. We visited Michter’s new facility in Louisville, KY on a bright day in May expecting a tour of the building and a taste of their products. Of course I’d sampled their Michter’s Small Batch US*1 Bourbon and Rye on a few occasions, so wasn’t expecting many surprises. I was terribly wrong in my assumptions.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

buffalo trace-22Buffalo Trace Distillery is located in Frankfort, Kentucky and is home to more bourbons than I’m likely to ever sample. And some of those bourbons are the stuff of legend (I’m thinking about Pappy Van Winkle here). But even those that don’t have quite as much legend behind them are top picks for many of us. We were able to sample some unique and interesting spirits during our visit, but the tasting was second to our visit with master distiller Harlan Wheatley and our tour lead by Kristie Wooldridge.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

fish with lemon sauceI landed at Logan Airport in Boston for one of my favorite weeks of the year. I had several entertaining gigs lined up but the main purpose of my visit was to visit my close Friend Bethany Carver. She and I met when we were 18 and spending a summer in Newport R.I. We were poor; we reached between the couch cushions for coins so we could share a glass of wine and a shrimp each. When the tourist season picked up and the tips rolled in, we spent most of our cash on food and drinks.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Brown-Forman Cooperage 3 of 19There are six requirements for a whiskey to be called ‘Bourbon’. One of them is that the liquor must be aged in new, charred oak barrels. This barrel aging is what gives bourbons their color and is a significant flavor component. While aging in barrels isn’t unique to bourbon, the requirement that each barrel is NEW is. And when you consider how much bourbon is consumed each year it becomes obvious that barrels can become a scarce commodity even faster than the main ingredient in bourbon - corn.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

lobster and chardonnayEvery year I looked forward to my invite to Cash and Lynne’s summer home in Maine. It was a standing invitation but things changed from year to year so I waited to be invited. They had young-adult children and I had to fit my visit in among graduations and birthdays. I had gone from Ms. Sterling to Aunt Sylvia and finally I was just plain Sylvia to their three kids. Their oldest boy was Richard, who had crept into the close-knit lobster boat community. He provided the fresh crustaceans for our annual lobster feed. At 14, he started hanging out on the docks and now at 22, he was like a son to the old salts. As their guest, I provided the wine to be paired with the lobster and this year I chose a Chardonnay (Talbott Sleepy Hollow 2012).

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Evan_Williams_12_of_37.jpgEvan Williams is a well known name in the Bourbon business and the first to open a downtown visitor center and distillery. We visited the Evan Williams Experience in downtown Louisville, KY for a tour and a visit with Artisan Distiller Charlie Downs. The Experience occupies a single building divided into a lobby, a walking tour of the history of the brand, and an artisanal distillery.

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Ex Logo 247x92

Are you interested in Beer? How about Bourbon or Scotch? Or maybe Bacon is more to your liking. Subscribe to our ongoing coverage of all these and more!

Get our newsletter on a highly irregular and infrequent basis.

Just sign up here and I'll send you the Exuberation! newsletter every so often.

That means usually about once each month, though it will be less frequent if I forget to send it, or more frequent if I think there's something really important you should know about.

Either way if you don't like what you're getting you can unsubscribe without any hassle. And now, I won't give/sell/rent your email address to anyone at all... promise!

 Just put your information here and I'll handle the rest.

Thanks;

Scott

Submit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Last weekend we were able to visit 5 bourbon distilleries in the Lexington, Kentucky area. I'll be posting individual articles about each over the next several weeks. Several of them include personal interviews with the Master Distillers. The interviews, the tours, and the bourbons themselves were all spectacular so stay tuned. Below is a Google auto-generated story of some of the highlights.